Em comemoração do aniverário de 50 anos do relatório Warren sobre o assassinato de Kennedy

General News 9/11/2014 at 10:00:06

Revelations Mark This Month’s 50th JFK Warren Report Anniversary

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But the Warren Report anniversary is different. Serious news coverage necessarily focuses on the commission’s methods and evidence. That creates a rare reform opportunity.

For at least these moments, an opportunity is presented to inform the public which can then question how Congress and other oversight bodies continue to duck the issues that lie at the heart of our national discomfort and disease.

Now it’s your turn as members of the public. Only a few can attend conferences. But anyone can research the materials and reach a reasonably well-informed judgment.

If you can, attend the conference. If you can’t, then inform yourself about what happened and is happening.

The 1964 CBS documentary noted above, while providing a premature all-out indictment of Lee Oswald, did accurately predict the situation in which we now find ourselves:

“We must depend on our own judgment, and look into our own conscience. The Warren Commission cannot give Oswald his day in court and the protection of our law,” as Cronkite intoned. “We are the jury, all of us, in America and throughout the world.”

Note: Andrew Kreig is AARC’s communications and development director but the opinions in this column do not necessarily reflect AARC’s.

(Article changed on September 11, 2014 at 10:37)

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Earl Warren, fifth from the left, presents President Lyndon Johnson the Warren Commission's report on the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Third from the right is former CIA Director Allen Dulles, who resigned under pressure in the fall of 1961.

Ministro Earl Warren, da Corte Suprema Norte Americana, o quinto a partir da esquerda, entrega ao presidente Lyndon Johnson o relatório da Comissão Warren sobre o assassinato de Kennedy em 1963. A partir da direita, o terceiro, é Allen Dulles, diretor da C.I.A. que foi forçado a se demitir sobre pressão, em 1961.

Sept. 26 marks the 50th anniversary of the Warren Commission’s report on President John F. Kennedy’s murder.

This unique, landmark date sets the stage to review the commission’s findings, consider what many scholars consider to be a longstanding cover-up — and thus provides a chance to reverse their damaging impact on the nation’s government and watchdog institutions.

“Because of new revelations few serious scholars any longer believe the Warren Report’s core finding on Oswald as a lone killer, acting alone,” says Assassinations Archives and Research Center (AARC) President James Lesar.

This non-profit group has organized “The Warren Report and the JFK Assassination: A Half Century of Significant Disclosures,” which he describes as “what may be one of the most important JFK assassination conferences in history.”

 

More than 40 authors, medical doctors, academics, lawyers and other research experts will convene from Sept. 26 to 28 in Bethesda, MD to reveal recent findings differing from the Warren Commission’s 1964 report.

I have been working the past month as AARC’s communications director to help prepare this conference exploring the assassination, the investigations, the new revelations, and their relevance to today’s world.

The purpose? Hopefully, to inform the public about what has happened in this country and to lay a foundation upon which we can reclaim rule of law under the Constitution. In turn, this could create a framework for the public better to understand today’s oft-time baffling news, particularly on matters involving intelligence and politics.

My talk will be “The Long Shadow of the JFK assassination” about the continuing impact of the JFK killing in undermining democracy.

AARC’s executive director Jerry Policoff is doing even more. He is a senior editor at OEN and one of the nation’s pioneering experts on covert relationships between the CIA and the news media.

With the encouragement of OEN Publisher Rob Kall, Policoff plans a series of columns in coming weeks reporting for OEN the significance of presentations by conference speakers.

One presentation, for example, will be by former Notre Dame Law School Prof. Robert Blakey, who was general counsel for the 1970s House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA). In 1979, it concluded that JFK fell victim to a conspiracy by unspecified people.

Blakey and former HSCA staffers Ed Lopez and Dan Hardway are expected to comment on the HSCA’s working relationship with the CIA and the CIA’s overt and covert attempts to impede and frustrate the HSCA’s investigation.

Others making rare or unprecedented appearances will be:

Alpha 66 founder Antonio Veciana, leader of the CIA-backed Cuban exile group that tried to kill Cuban leader Fidel Castro; and Prof. Ernst Titovets, who was Oswald’s best friend in the Soviet Union. Titovets will release a new edition of his 2010 memoir arguing that Oswald was a relatively normal young man and not a threat to kill anyone.

Among other speakers are: Dr. Gary Aguilar, Russ Baker, Jim DiEugenio, Dr. Peter Kornbluh, Robert Groden, Prof. Joan Mellen, Jefferson Morley, Prof. John Newman, Dr. Randolph Robertson, Lisa Pease, Prof. Peter Dale Scott, Dr. Wayne Smith, Pat Speer, Anthony Summers, David Talbot, Dr. Donald Thomas, Dr. Cyril H. Wecht, Lamar Waldron, and Dr. David Wrone.

Actors Brian Connors and John Heard are flying to DC from Hollywood to lead a free dramatic reading of a transcript of a Warren Commission secret meeting, one they thought was not recorded, showing the leadership role of former CIA Director Allen Dulles in the Commission’s work and their own doubts about what they were doing.

President Kennedy resisted the CIA’s growing influence over public life. Thus, Kennedy, after the Bay of Pigs, vowed to break the CIA into a thousand pieces and scatter them to the wind. In the fall of 1961, he forced out the CIA’s top leadership, including Dulles and his two deputies. One was General Charles Cabell, brother of the mayor of Dallas. In the budget JFK sent to Congress in 1963, he suggested major cuts to the CIA’s budget.

Similarities to Kennedy’s concerns can be found in the words of his two presidential predecessors, Democrat Harry Truman and Republican Dwight Eisenhower. At times, they each expressed deep concern about the threat to America’s traditions from, as Eisenhower described it in his 1961 Farewell Address, “The military and industrial complex.”

In many ways, the debate over JFK’s murder pits the nation’s elite — including government agencies and the national media — against public opinion.

The rush to judgment is apparent in a CBS documentary on the Warren report aired 50 years ago. For nearly the entire two-hour broadcast, CBS anchor Walter Cronkite and a youthful Dan Rather parroted in somber tones the commission’s murder case against Oswald. They contrasted what Cronkite “the liar, the misfit” against what the announcer described as a thorough investigation by “seven distinguished Americans” finding guilt.

 

We know from declassified documents that the CIA’s Operation Mockingbird played an immense role later in persuading its allies in the news media at the ownership level and in academia to defend the Warren Report.

Today?

Virtually all major news outlets editorialized last year, once again, that Oswald killed JFK, acting alone, as I reported last fall for the Justice Integrity Project in a multi-part JFK “Readers Guide.” One example was “Disputes Erupt Over NY Times, New Yorker, WashPo Reviews of JFK Murder.”

Yet opinion polls for decades have shown majorities disbelieve the report’s central finding that Oswald acted alone. Almost nowhere else in public life do we have such strong bipartisan agreement in the public standing in opposition to elite consensus — and with proof so readily at hand.

Why does it matter that the controversy still lingers about Kennedy’s killing? Why does the government continue to refuse to release classified records related to the case? And why do independent researchers continue to demand release of all JFK assassination records?

For one thing, AARC’s Lesar notes, Congress passed a 1992 law requiring that release. More generally, Lesar says:

The Warren Report marked the profound slide in public distrust in government and the press. And JFK assassination and those of Dr. Martin Luther King and Robert F. Kennedy created a devastating political impact that continues to erode democratic government.

The result has been to encourage the rampant growth of the national security state in ways that have had profound adverse effects on our world standing, our economic vitality, and our personal liberty

Virtually every day, OEN publishes multiple columns illustrating the same kinds of suspicions against opinion leaders as evident in the JFK assassination debates. Government operations are increasingly secret, or unreported by news media that are focused heavily on entertainment, celebrities and personality-driven political opinion.

Society’s sleeping watchdogs had their chance last year to dig deep during the 50th anniversary of the killing. Amid the many homages to JFK’s lost life and legacy, the public saw scraps of disturbing evidence interspersed with wacky theories that simply created confusion.

But the Warren Report anniversary is different. Serious news coverage necessarily focuses on the commission’s methods and evidence. That creates a rare reform opportunity.

For at least these moments, an opportunity is presented to inform the public which can then question how Congress and other oversight bodies continue to duck the issues that lie at the heart of our national discomfort and disease.

Now it’s your turn as members of the public. Only a few can attend conferences. But anyone can research the materials and reach a reasonably well-informed judgment.

If you can, attend the conference. If you can’t, then inform yourself about what happened and is happening.

The 1964 CBS documentary noted above, while providing a premature all-out indictment of Lee Oswald, did accurately predict the situation in which we now find ourselves:

“We must depend on our own judgment, and look into our own conscience. The Warren Commission cannot give Oswald his day in court and the protection of our law,” as Cronkite intoned. “We are the jury, all of us, in America and throughout the world.”

 

Note: Andrew Kreig is AARC’s communications and development director but the opinions in this column do not necessarily reflect AARC’s.

(Article changed on September 11, 2014 at 10:37)

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